Joe Paopao, has joined the SFU Clan as their new offensive co-ordinator.

Paopao hopes to end SFU’s coaching carousel
WEALTH OF EX­PE­RI­ENCE: Former B.C. Lions coach and star takes over as of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor for the Clan

Joe Paopao, who is 25 years into his ca­reer as a foot­ball coach, has joined the SFU Clan as their new of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor.

When Joe Paopao tells you that he knows first-hand what life is like for stu­dent-ath­letes and their fam­i­lies at the col­le­giate level, he is speak­ing from per­sonal ex­pe­ri­ence.

“Hav­ing four chil­dren of my own that were stu­dent-ath­letes re­ally helps in know­ing what their mind­set is,” the for­mer B.C. Lions’ star quar­ter­back of the late ’70s and early ’80s said Wed­nes­day af­ter he was of­fi­cially an­nounced as the new of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor of the Si­mon Fraser Clan foot­ball team.

“For me, it’s a great op­por­tu­nity to re­con­nect with this age group. I just want all of them to think of their next four to five years of uni­ver­sity as some­thing they will re­mem­ber 40 or 50 years from now.”

And that, aside from a re­sume chock full of Xs and Os as a for­mer CFL head coach, co-or­di­na­tor and po­si­tion coach, as well as a plethora of other var­ied ex­pe­ri­ences within the game, is what drew newly-hired Clan head coach Kelly Bates to put Paopao in charge of the of­fen­sive side of Si­mon Fraser’s at­tack.

And that, aside from a re­sume chock full of Xs and Os as a for­mer CFL head coach, co-or­di­na­tor and po­si­tion coach, as well as a plethora of other var­ied ex­pe­ri­ences within the game, is what drew newly-hired Clan head coach Kelly Bates to put Paopao in charge of the of­fen­sive side of Si­mon Fraser’s at­tack.

And that, aside from a re­sume chock full of Xs and Os as a for­mer CFL head coach, co-or­di­na­tor and po­si­tion coach, as well as a plethora of other var­ied ex­pe­ri­ences within the game, is what drew newly-hired Clan head coach Kelly Bates to put Paopao in charge of the of­fen­sive side of Si­mon Fraser’s at­tack.

“Joe has so much foot­ball knowl­edge in his pinky fin­ger, and all of that fig­ures into the de­ci­sion,” said Bates, who last sea­son, like Paopao, was a mem­ber of the Lions coach­ing staff.

“Joe has so much foot­ball knowl­edge in his pinky fin­ger, and all of that fig­ures into the de­ci­sion,” said Bates, who last sea­son, like Paopao, was a mem­ber of the Lions coach­ing staff.

“But the big­gest fac­tor is Joe and who he is, how he treats peo­ple the right way, and how per­son­able he is.”

Paopao, 59, spent 11 sea­sons as a quar­ter­back in the CFL and is now 25 sea­sons into his coach­ing ca­reer. He has been the head coach of the Lions and Ot­tawa Rene­gades, as well as the of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor with the Lions, Ed­mon­ton Eski­mos, Win­nipeg Blue Bombers and Hamil­ton Tiger-Cats.

Paopao was also the of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor with San Fran­cisco of the short-lived XFL and spent seven sea­sons in Cana­dian In­teruni­ver­sity Sport at Water­loo (2007-13), where he was the head coach for two sea­sons and the of­fen­sive co­or­di­na­tor for five.

He has also coached in the U.S. at both the high school and ju­nior col­lege lev­els.

And now, there is a re­turn to the four-down game.

“It is very ex­cit­ing,” Paopao said, “but I have to be up front in that hav­ing my son at Eastern Ore­gon is a help.”

Paopao’s old­est son Tyler is that school’s of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor, one which com­petes in the NAIA’s Fron­tier Con­fer­ence.

Paopao’s old­est son Tyler is that school’s of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor, one which com­petes in the NAIA’s Fron­tier Con­fer­ence.

Wed­nes­day, in the midst of the Clan’s spring foot­ball prac­tices, the Honolulu na­tive and for­mer col­le­giate star at Long Beach State stressed the im­por­tance of con­nect­ing with his play­ers, most who have seen a carousel of coaches over their Clan ca­reers.

“In ev­ery sit­u­a­tion, I am try­ing to eval­u­ate, to get a sense of where they are at men­tally and phys­i­cally,” Paopao said. “In all fair­ness, I am their fourth of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor in four years and this is the third new staff in three years for these young men. I am sen­si­tive to that. As 19- to 22-year-olds, they are im­pres­sion­able. You have to let them know that it’s a new year and I know that is eas­ier said than done, but that is what the game is.”

SFU caps spring sea­son with a con­trolled scrim­mage set for a 2 p.m. start April 4.

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Sports
Paopao hopes to end SFU’s coaching carousel
WEALTH OF EX­PE­RI­ENCE: Former B.C. Lions coach and star takes over as of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor for the Clan

HOWARD TSUMURA
Article tools

B
RIC ERNST/PNG FILES Joe Paopao, who is 25 years into his ca­reer as a foot­ball coach, has joined the SFU Clan as their new of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor.

When Joe Paopao tells you that he knows first-hand what life is like for stu­dent-ath­letes and their fam­i­lies at the col­le­giate level, he is speak­ing from per­sonal ex­pe­ri­ence.

“Hav­ing four chil­dren of my own that were stu­dent-ath­letes re­ally helps in know­ing what their mind­set is,” the for­mer B.C. Lions’ star quar­ter­back of the late ’70s and early ’80s said Wed­nes­day af­ter he was of­fi­cially an­nounced as the new of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor of the Si­mon Fraser Clan foot­ball team.

“For me, it’s a great op­por­tu­nity to re­con­nect with this age group. I just want all of them to think of their next four to five years of uni­ver­sity as some­thing they will re­mem­ber 40 or 50 years from now.”

And that, aside from a re­sume chock full of Xs and Os as a for­mer CFL head coach, co-or­di­na­tor and po­si­tion coach, as well as a plethora of other var­ied ex­pe­ri­ences within the game, is what drew newly-hired Clan head coach Kelly Bates to put Paopao in charge of the of­fen­sive side of Si­mon Fraser’s at­tack.

And that, aside from a re­sume chock full of Xs and Os as a for­mer CFL head coach, co-or­di­na­tor and po­si­tion coach, as well as a plethora of other var­ied ex­pe­ri­ences within the game, is what drew newly-hired Clan head coach Kelly Bates to put Paopao in charge of the of­fen­sive side of Si­mon Fraser’s at­tack.

And that, aside from a re­sume chock full of Xs and Os as a for­mer CFL head coach, co-or­di­na­tor and po­si­tion coach, as well as a plethora of other var­ied ex­pe­ri­ences within the game, is what drew newly-hired Clan head coach Kelly Bates to put Paopao in charge of the of­fen­sive side of Si­mon Fraser’s at­tack.

“Joe has so much foot­ball knowl­edge in his pinky fin­ger, and all of that fig­ures into the de­ci­sion,” said Bates, who last sea­son, like Paopao, was a mem­ber of the Lions coach­ing staff.

“Joe has so much foot­ball knowl­edge in his pinky fin­ger, and all of that fig­ures into the de­ci­sion,” said Bates, who last sea­son, like Paopao, was a mem­ber of the Lions coach­ing staff.

“But the big­gest fac­tor is Joe and who he is, how he treats peo­ple the right way, and how per­son­able he is.”

Paopao, 59, spent 11 sea­sons as a quar­ter­back in the CFL and is now 25 sea­sons into his coach­ing ca­reer. He has been the head coach of the Lions and Ot­tawa Rene­gades, as well as the of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor with the Lions, Ed­mon­ton Eski­mos, Win­nipeg Blue Bombers and Hamil­ton Tiger-Cats.

Paopao was also the of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor with San Fran­cisco of the short-lived XFL and spent seven sea­sons in Cana­dian In­teruni­ver­sity Sport at Water­loo (200713), where he was the head coach for two sea­sons and the of­fen­sive co­or­di­na­tor for five.

He has also coached in the U.S. at both the high school and ju­nior col­lege lev­els.

And now, there is a re­turn to the four-down game.

“It is very ex­cit­ing,” Paopao said, “but I have to be up front in that hav­ing my son at Eastern Ore­gon is a help.”

Paopao’s old­est son Tyler is that school’s of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor, one which com­petes in the NAIA’s Fron­tier Con­fer­ence.

Paopao’s old­est son Tyler is that school’s of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor, one which com­petes in the NAIA’s Fron­tier Con­fer­ence.

Wed­nes­day, in the midst of the Clan’s spring foot­ball prac­tices, the Honolulu na­tive and for­mer col­le­giate star at Long Beach State stressed the im­por­tance of con­nect­ing with his play­ers, most who have seen a carousel of coaches over their Clan ca­reers.

“In ev­ery sit­u­a­tion, I am try­ing to eval­u­ate, to get a sense of where they are at men­tally and phys­i­cally,” Paopao said. “In all fair­ness, I am their fourth of­fen­sive co-or­di­na­tor in four years and this is the third new staff in three years for these young men. I am sen­si­tive to that. As 19- to 22-year-olds, they are im­pres­sion­able. You have to let them know that it’s a new year and I know that is eas­ier said than done, but that is what the game is.”

SFU caps spring sea­son with a con­trolled scrim­mage set for a 2 p.m. start April 4.
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The Province26 Mar 2015Page 66
India won’t back down from aggressive style of Aussies

JOHN PYE
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B
— THE AS­SO­CI­ATED PRESS FILES Ro­hit Sharma says In­dia has the ad­van­tage of ex­pe­ri­ence af­ter win­ning the pre­vi­ous World Cup in a semi­fi­nal game against four-time win­ner Aus­tralia set for Thurs­day.

SYD­NEY, Aus­tralia — Ac­ri­mony is om­nipresent when­ever Aus­tralia and In­dia clash in cricket. With a spot in the Cricket World Cup fi­nal against New Zealand on the line, ex­pect the in­ten­sity to peak.

In­dia bats­man Ro­hit Sharma said his squad was pre­pared to fight fire with fire in Thurs­day’s semi­fi­nal against four-time cham­pion Aus­tralia, which has forged its rep­u­ta­tion on an ag­gres­sive, un­com­pro­mis­ing brand of the game.

In­dia, which beat Aus­tralia in a quar­ter-fi­nal in 2011 en route to win­ning the ti­tle on home soil, has been in Aus­tralia since Novem­ber, but didn’t win a com­pet­i­tive match un­til the World Cup kicked off. Since then, Ma­hen­dra Singh Dhoni’s squad has won seven con­sec­u­tive games, bowl­ing out the op­po­si­tion ev­ery time.

In­dia, which beat Aus­tralia in a quar­ter-fi­nal in 2011 en route to win­ning the ti­tle on home soil, has been in Aus­tralia since Novem­ber, but didn’t win a com­pet­i­tive match un­til the World Cup kicked off. Since then, Ma­hen­dra Singh Dhoni’s squad has won seven con­sec­u­tive games, bowl­ing out the op­po­si­tion ev­ery time.

But top-ranked Aus­tralia has lost just one lim­ited-overs in­ter­na­tional to In­dia at the Syd­ney Cricket Ground, some­thing of an enigma con­sid­er­ing it’s the one venue in Aus­tralia which tends to favour spin and dom­i­nated the bi­lat­eral test and ODI se­ries lead­ing up to the World Cup.

Sharma, who scored a cen­tury in In­dia’s quar­ter-fi­nal win over Bangladesh, said In­dia’s squad had the ad­van­tage of ex­pe­ri­ence in win­ning the pre­vi­ous World Cup and had the form bowl­ing at­tack in the tour­na­ment.

Sharma, who scored a cen­tury in In­dia’s quar­ter-fi­nal win over Bangladesh, said In­dia’s squad had the ad­van­tage of ex­pe­ri­ence in win­ning the pre­vi­ous World Cup and had the form bowl­ing at­tack in the tour­na­ment.

“We know how to play big games. We’ve been part of it,” he said. “We bring the best out of ev­ery­one dur­ing those big matches.”

Play­ers from both teams were fined and cau­tioned dur­ing the test se­ries as a re­sult of heated on-field ex­changes.
Continue
Paopao hopes to end SFU’s coaching carousel
WEALTH OF EXPERIENCE: Former B.C. Lions coach and star takes over as offensive co-ordinator for the Clan

The Province
26 Mar 2015
HOWARD TSUMURA

RIC ERNST/PNG FILESJoe Paopao, who is 25 years into his career as a football coach, has joined the SFU Clan as their new offensive co-ordinator.

When Joe Paopao tells you that he knows first-hand what life is like for student-athletes and their families at the collegiate level, he is speaking from personal experience.

“Having four children of my own that were student-athletes really helps in knowing what their mindset is,” the former B.C. Lions’ star quarterback of the late ’70s and early ’80s said Wednesday after he was officially announced as the new offensive co-ordinator of the Simon Fraser Clan football team.

“For me, it’s a great opportunity to reconnect with this age group. I just want all of them to think of their next four to five years of university as something they will remember 40 or 50 years from now.”

And that, aside from a resume chock full of Xs and Os as a former CFL head coach, co-ordinator and position coach, as well as a plethora of other varied experiences within the game, is what drew newly-hired Clan head coach Kelly Bates to put Paopao in charge of the offensive side of Simon Fraser’s attack.

“Joe has so much football knowledge in his pinky finger, and all of that figures into the decision,” said Bates, who last season, like Paopao, was a member of the Lions coaching staff.

“But the biggest factor is Joe and who he is, how he treats people the right way, and how personable he is.”

Paopao, 59, spent 11 seasons as a quarterback in the CFL and is now 25 seasons into his coaching career. He has been the head coach of the Lions and Ottawa Renegades, as well as the offensive co-ordinator with the Lions, Edmonton Eskimos, Winnipeg Blue Bombers and Hamilton Tiger-Cats.

Paopao was also the offensive co-ordinator with San Francisco of the short-lived XFL and spent seven seasons in Canadian Interuniversity Sport at Waterloo (200713), where he was the head coach for two seasons and the offensive coordinator for five.

He has also coached in the U.S. at both the high school and junior college levels.

And now, there is a return to the four-down game.

“It is very exciting,” Paopao said, “but I have to be up front in that having my son at Eastern Oregon is a help.”

Paopao’s oldest son Tyler is that school’s offensive co-ordinator, one which competes in the NAIA’s Frontier Conference.

Wednesday, in the midst of the Clan’s spring football practices, the Honolulu native and former collegiate star at Long Beach State stressed the importance of connecting with his players, most who have seen a carousel of coaches over their Clan careers.

“In every situation, I am trying to evaluate, to get a sense of where they are at mentally and physically,” Paopao said. “In all fairness, I am their fourth offensive co-ordinator in four years and this is the third new staff in three years for these young men. I am sensitive to that. As 19- to 22-year-olds, they are impressionable. You have to let them know that it’s a new year and I know that is easier said than done, but that is what the game is.”

SFU caps spring season with a controlled scrimmage set for a 2 p.m. start April 4.

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